Press Releases

 

[CNBC, and 3,219 other media outlets carried this review]

Mother’s Day Gift: Nurses Find New Tool to Advocate for Their Profession, Says Healthcare Communications Specialist Candy Campbell

CONCORD, Calif., May 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — In celebration of National Nurses Week, May 6-12, and Mother’s Day, May 8th, nurses have a new tool to advocate for their profession. With the book My Mom Is A Nurse (ISBN 978-09842385-0-7), Healthcare Communication Specialist Candy Campbell, RN, seeks to help bridge the gap in the long-range nursing shortage.

“As a profession, nurses are still recovering from the backlash of the women’s lib movement,” states the author. She recalls that for decades, the nursing profession was one of three accepted female career paths, but these days, many would-be nurses have opted for the physician’s role. “Don’t get me wrong, the world needs women physicians, too. One isn’t better than the other, but they are definitely different.”

The author quotes the 2010 US government report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), which recognizes that advanced education and training of nurses, a group over 3 million strong, hold the key to cutting healthcare costs and improving health and wellness. “People need to know what a diverse profession nursing is; there are opportunities to serve in so many capacities. We also need to attract and train enough qualified candidates. This book takes a small step in that direction,” Campbell says.

She envisioned the book while searching for a baby-shower gift for one of her colleagues. “I was looking for a picture-book about the nursing profession that was informative, fun, and maybe had a little something special on each page, kind of like the classic Goodnight Moon. Unfortunately, there just wasn’t anything available.”

Fortunately, Campbell, who also has an award-winning documentary film to her credit (Micropremature Babies: How Low Can You Go?), was used to creative challenges. “I started to complain about not being able to find such a book, when it hit me. Aha! Sounds like my next must-do project.”

My Mom Is A Nurse is a non-fiction book for ages 0-8, where children from many cultures are introduced to some of the important and exciting work nurses do through playful text and whimsical illustrations. “It’s really cute, if I do say so,” quips the author, “thanks to some wonderful artwork by Michael Vincent Fusco, who patiently put up with my nitpicking. The reviewers, young and not-so-young, have been very enthusiastic about it.”

Curious readers can look into this delightful picture book on Amazon.com.

About Candy Campbell

Candy Campbell (also known as Candy the Nurse) is an author, filmmaker, actor, and speaker who specializes in healthcare communications. As a passionate proponent of maternal-child health and public health policy issues, she serves on the Editorial Advisory Board for two consumer magazines from the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), and volunteers as a public health advocate through the American Nurses’ Association of CA. An adjunct professor at CSU East Bay, she also donates a portion of the proceeds of each of her books (and the film, Micropremature Babies: How Low Can You Go?) to the March of Dimes, for whom she serves as a media spokesperson in Northern CA.

For more information, visit http://candycampbell.com,

email candy@candycampbell.com, or call 925-207-1376.

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[FORBES Magazine, YAHOO! Finance, and 345 other media outlets carried this report]

Parents of Premature Infants Can Find Helpful Advice, Says Healthcare Communications Specialist Candy Campbell

CONCORD, Calif., Nov. 16, 2010 /PRNewswire/ — Years after the homecoming, parents of premature infants frequently report difficulty explaining the concept to their children, and are unprepared to handle their strong reactions.
That doesn’t have to be the case, says healthcare communication specialist Candy Campbell, author of “Good Things Come In Small Packages (I Was a Preemie )” (2010, ISBN  978-0-9842385-1-4). Campbell states her research with parents of premature infants turned up some surprising discoveries. When the time comes to view photos of the preemies’ first few weeks and months of life, many children elicit strong feelings.
Some of the most common reactions include:
“You left me alone with strangers?”
“Why did you let them stick tubes in me?”
“Was I a ‘bad baby?’”
“Why was I born early?’”

The I Was a Preemie book was conceived to help parents diffuse the young child’s feelings of hurt, anger and confusion when faced with the difficult facts of his/her early beginnings. “Parents who bring their children home after several grueling weeks or months in the neonatal intensive care unit just want to stash those pictures under the bed and get on with the business of life,” says Campbell. “They are so shell-shocked from the trauma and the drama of the NICU, it’s totally understandable. When the child goes to preschool or kindergarten, a typical homework assignment is to bring in a baby picture. That’s when the trouble begins.”
One such parent, who knew Campbell as a children’s book author and neonatal nurse, requested she write a book addressing the issue. “Since she is a friend, and we met when I took care of her daughters, of course I felt compelled to take up the challenge.”
The result? “It’s a story told in one little person’s voice, as he discovers his difficult beginnings. Parents tell me the book’s message has a great impact on kids: they hear how they were loved even before they were born. I think, intuitively, that’s very comforting. It’s what we all want to know.”
Prompted by the fact premature births have risen to over 500,00 a year in the U.S. alone, November has been declared National Prematurity Awareness Month. According to the March of Dimes, prematurity today is as common as polio in the 1940s. Despite the latest research into causes of prematurity, a sure-cure is not yet within reach. One of the main drivers is the number of women who defer childbearing until later in life. Older mothers, and/or mothers of multiples, are often unable to carry their infants to term (40 weeks). In keeping with this month’s theme, I Was a Preemie is available now from Amazon, in softcover or eBook.
About Candy Campbell
Candace A. Campbell (also known as Candy the Nurse) is an author, filmmaker, actress, and speaker who specializes in healthcare communications. As a passionate proponent of maternal-child health and public health policy issues, she serves on the Editorial Advisory Board for two consumer magazines from the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), and volunteers as a public health advocate through the American Nurses’ Association of CA. She donates a significant portion of the proceeds of each of her books (and the film, Micropremature Babies: How Low Can You Go?) to the March of Dimes, for whom she serves as a media spokesperson in Northern CA. For more information, visit http://candycampbell.com

To access the link, click HERE

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Book review: ‘Good Things Come in Small Packages: I Was a Preemie’

By Amy Wang, The Oregonian

April 08, 2010, 4:18PM


good-things.jpgView full sizePeripatetic ProductionsHere’s a relative rarity: a book written specifically for children who were born prematurely. 

“Good Things Come in Small Packages” (Peripatetic Publishing, 28 pages, $14.95) was the idea ofCandy Campbell, a Portland native and registered nurse who’s also madea documentary film about “micropremature” babies. She wrote the book from the viewpoint of a little boy learning about his too-soon arrival from his parents, grandfather, uncle and other family members.  

The short story is told in simple and sweet language that is best suited to beginning readers (the book is recommended for up to age 8). Michael Vincent Fusco’s soft, bright and humorous illustrations complement the text nicely. In a nice touch, the boy wears thick glasses — “a nod to the fact that so many of our micropreemies have eye surgery and need to wear glasses at an early age,” says Campbell. I’m thinking the glasses also give parents an opening to discuss the fact that preemies sometimes have long-term health and/or developmental issues. 

It’s definitely a book I’ll be sharing with my own former preemie.  

The price may seem a little high, but $1 from each sale goes to March of Dimes, a national nonprofit whose mission includes preventing premature births.

Got another book about preemies to recommend? Share it below in the comments section. 

And for more children’s books about preemies, check outhttp://www.prematurity.org/premiebooks4children.html.

– Amy Wang

http://blog.oregonlive.com/themombeat/2010/04/book_review_good_things_come_i_1.html

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Nurse Sends Messages of Care Through Book, Video
By Laura M. Stakal
Monday June 15, 2009

Candy Campbell, RN, wants to reach out to families and nurses through education. That’s why she wrote the children’s book “My Mom is a Nurse” and directed the film “Micropremature Babies: How Low Can You Go?”

Now Campbell, an NICU nurse for more than 15 years, was asked to be a spokeswoman for the California Chapter of the March of Dimes. In this role, she says she will help with fundraising and speak at March of Dimes events.

“My mission is just to help families cope,” says Campbell, who adds that a portion of proceeds from her book and movie benefit baby-friendly charities including Easter Seals and March of Dimes.

“Micropremature Babies: How Low Can you Go?” was a 2003 finalist for the International Medical Media Awards, also known as “The Freddies.”

Campbell says her aim is to get the video into the hands of parents. Hospitals also have used the video as a training tool because it addresses what parents of premature babies are going through.

“It asks important questions we need to be asking,” she says.

Campbell adds that the theme in her work is all about telling the truth in love. “I want them to laugh, but I also want them to be touched.”

Her book became available for sale the week of Mother’s Day, which also was National Nurses Week.

“My Mom is a Nurse” is available for sale online.

“The stars were aligned,” she says.

The film — which was a finalist for the International Medical Media Awards — and the book are available to purchase online. Learn more about Campbell’s work and view the movie trailer at www.candycampbell.com.


Laura M. Stakal is regional editor for NurseWeek. To comment, e-mail editorCA@nurseweek.com.